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Roundup Weed Killer

You could be eligible for compensation to offset healthcare costs associated with long-term use of Roundup Weed Killer.

Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Risk

Data shows ongoing long-term exposure to Monsanto’s Roundup Week Killer is linked to the development of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. There is also evidence exposure to the weed killer could lead to the development of celiac disease. Many farmers and gardeners have reported developing the disease after their use of the product and now, many have filed lawsuits against the weed killer’s manufacturer.

Roundup Use is Abundant

Roundup is the most common weed killer used in America and throughout the world, despite evidence it has been shown to cause cancer. According to the International Agency on Research, the Roundup is “probably carcinogenic.” The World Health Organization (WHO) has also expressed concerns about the safety of Roundup and also called it “probably carcinogenic.”

The most recent information from medical studies links glyphosate to DNA and chromosomal damage in human cells, kidney failure, chronic kidney disease, intestinal disorders, Celiac disease, and autism.

Though Monsanto continues to deny any risk and calls its product safety, health concerns are great enough that in July 2017, California added glyphosate to its list of cancer-causing chemicals under the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986. This means businesses must warn consumers if their products or facilities contain potentially unsafe amounts of any toxic substances known to cause cancer, birth defects, or other reproductive harm.

There are currently more than 1100 lawsuits in federal and state courts concerning Roundup and its potential link to lymphatic cancers. If you or a loved one developed non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma after using Roundup, you could be eligible to receive compensation.

Roundup and Glyphosate

Roundup contains glyphosate, an herbicide that targets a plant growth enzyme. It is used to kill weeds, but because of its widespread use over so many years, weeds have developed resistance. There is currently more than 260 glyphosate-resistant weed growing around the world and in order to eliminate these weeds, stronger and stronger doses of weed killer must be used.

Even farmers and gardeners who try to avoid exposure to glyphosate aren’t safe. It’s possible for runoff of Roundup to occur, which means the glyphosate travels into waterways and then applied, unknowingly, to crops. Animals have also been tested for the presence of glyphosate in their systems, which researchers believe comes from consuming crops vegetation sprayed with Roundup or from drinking the poisoned water.

In addition to exposure from weed killing, some farmers are actually killing their crops with glyphosate so they can harvest earlier than usual in areas prone to colder temperatures. This is most common in areas where wheat is grown. Monsanto’s PowerMAX Roundup herbicide even comes with instructions to spray pre-harvest. This means the food being eaten by consumers was potentially sprayed directly with Roundup just before harvest.

Roundup Exposure and Health Problems

The toxicity of glyphosate increases when it’s mixed with other ingredients in products. Those using Roundup and experiencing direct exposure have also reported irritation in the nose or throat, or on the skin.

There is also evidence that exposure to high levels of glyphosate could be linked to developmental and reproductive issues. Some researchers found glyphosate in sugar, corn, soy, and wheat, “enhance the damaging effects of other food-borne chemical residues and toxins in the environment to disrupt normal body functions and induce disease.”

Roundup Lawsuit

If you or a loved one developed non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma or any other cancer or disease after exposure to Roundup, you could be eligible for compensation.

Have you or a loved one experienced serious health complications after being exposed to Roundup Weed Killer? Are you a farmer who uses Roundup or other Monsanto products? Every case is different. Contact an attorney for more information.

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